Reading Roll Call Votes

Follow the steps listed below to look up the Representative's votes or the votes of any other Member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

You may want to read all of the steps or print this page before clicking on the appropriate links.

Step 1

Please visit the Legislation and Votes web page at the Clerk of the House website.  The following web page (or similar) will display:

How to Read Roll Call Votes on Clerk Website

 

Under the "Roll Call Votes" heading, choose the link of the appropriate Congress and Session to view roll call votes for that session.  In addition to the current Session of Congress you will also have the option to select and view roll call votes from previous sessions of Congress.

Step 2

Once you have selected the Congress and Session you want, a web page similar to the following will display:

Roll Call Votes

The far left column labeled "Roll" will give you the number of the roll call vote.  Moving to the column on the right, you see the date the vote was cast.  The "Question" tells you if the vote was on final passage, on an amendment, or as otherwise noted.  The "Result" is the outcome: P=passed, F=failed, and A=the amendment was agreed to.  The next column tells you the title/description of the measure.  All votes are posted in reverse chronological order (most recent at the top).

Step 3

Click on the appropriate "Roll" number on the same row as the title/description that you are interested in.  If it is an older vote that you are interested in (must be in the same year), move to the bottom of the screen and simply click on a previous set of roll call votes.

Step 4

A web page similar to the following will display:

'U.S. House of Representative Roll Call Votes' page from the House Clerk's website.  Features a six column table.  The first column (Roll) has the roll call vote number.  The second column (Date) has the date of the vote.  The third column (Issue) has the

Bills are prefixed with H.R. when introduced in the House and S. when introduced in the Senate, and they are followed by a number based on the order in which they are introduced. The vast majority of legislative proposals are in the form of bills. Bills deal with domestic and foreign issues and programs, and they also appropriate money to various government agencies and programs.

Joint Resolutions are designated H.J. Res. or S.J. Res. and are followed by a number. Like a bill, a joint resolution requires the approval of both Chambers in identical form and the president’s signature to become law. The joint resolution is generally used for continuing or emergency appropriations.

Concurrent Resolutions, which are designated H.Con. Res. or S.Con. Res., and followed by a number, must be passed in the same form by both houses, but they do not require the signature of the president and do not have the force of law. Concurrent resolutions are generally used to make or amend rules that apply to both houses. They are also used to express the sentiments of both of the houses.

Simple Resolutions are designated H.Res. and S.Res., followed by a number.  A simple resolution addresses matters entirely within the prerogative of one house, such as revising the standing rules of one Chamber. Simple resolutions are also used to express the sentiments of a single house.